KENT SCOUTS

HILL WALKING PERMITS

The Adventurous Activity Permit Scheme is designed to show that all those leading adventurous activities for young people within Scouting have the skills, experience and personal suitability to do so. It is designed so that it can be tailored to be as flexible as possible, while at the same time providing a robust checking process for leaders in adventurous activities. The permit should be seen as an enabling device to show a person’s competence and provide reassurance to parents of the young people.

 

What Is The Permit Scheme?

 

Everyone who leads an adventurous activity for young people within Scouting is required to hold an activity permit for that activity.

 

Details of which activities are classed as adventurous can be found in POR.

 

How Does It Work?

 

The person who grants a permit is your responsible Commissioner. This will be your District Commissioner if you have a Group or District appointment, and your County Commissioner if you have a County appointment.

 

A responsible Commissioner can only grant a permit on the recommendation of an Approved Assessor. To fulfil this role Kent Scouts have appointed County Assessors for many of the adventurous activities but where we are unable to provide an Assessor it is possible for us to liase with or invite Assessors from other Counties or suitably qualified External Assessors.

 

Kent Scouts Hillwalking Permits are supported by the Invicta Mountaineering SASU. To start your journey towards a permit please click here 

 

The Approved Assessor will provide the responsible Commissioner with a recommendation based on either a practical assessment based on the relevant Assessment Checklist (in most cases), or through looking at the qualifications, logged experience and past permits of an Applicant.

 

A permit is time limited up to a maximum of five years at which point it expires. If you wish to continue leading the activity for young people you will need to apply for a new permit. However if the new permit is to exactly the same level as the old permit and you have been active within your activity, there may be no need for a practical assessment. That decision is up to the Approved Assessor.

 

There are also no age limitations to gaining a permit, so as long as the Applicant has the skills and experience required, it is quite feasible for a young person to gain a permit.

 

Types Of Permits There are three levels of permit available;

 

1 Personal

 

These permits allow under 18s to take part in adventurous activities without the need for someone with a leadership or supervisory permit to be present. They can participate with others with personal permits, but can not participate with or lead anyone without a permit.

 

2 Leadership

 

These permits allow you to lead an activity for a group of young people. You need to remain with the group throughout the activity.

 

3 Supervisory

 

These permits allow you to remotely supervise a number of groups taking part in the activity. Further details of how these permits work for each activity can be found in the factsheet for the specific activity.

 

 

 

 

 

What Is Assessed?

 

There are four areas assessed to gain a permit:

 

1 Technical Competence

 

This is assessed by the Approved Assessor and looks at the specific technical skills required to run the activity. It is usually assessed through a practical assessment.

 

2 Scout Association Rules

 

This can be assessed by either a County Assessor, or the responsible Commissioner when using an External Assessor. It looks at whether the Applicant is aware of the activity Rules and how they affect the activity within Scouting.

 

3 Child Protection (not for personal permits)

 

This will be carried out by the responsible Commissioner and ensures that the necessary Personal Enquiry checks have been carried out and the appropriate child protection training has taken place.

 

4 Personal Suitability

 

This is carried out by the responsible Commissioner, often in conjunction with a Group Scout Leader or similar, to check the Applicant is suitable (in terms of attitude) to be leading an adventurous activity for young people.

 

Please register your applications with Nick Jeggo who will support your application and liase with the Assessor Team.

 

Permit Application Form

 

BACK

 

Want to know about Terrain Categories....

 

Rule 9.28 Terrain Zero Definition

 

Terrain Zero describes terrain which meets one of the following criteria:

 

a. Meets all the following criteria:

  • is below 500 metres above sea level; and

  • is within 30 minutes travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of summoning help (such as a telephone box); and

  • contains no element of steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This does not stop people from using their hands as an aid to confidence.)

or:

b. Is a road, or path adjacent to a road, on which you would expect to see traffic.

Rule 9.29 Terrain One Definition

 

Terrain One describes terrain which meets all of the following criteria:

 

a. Meets any of the following criteria:

  • is below 800 metres but more than 500 metres above sea level or;

  • is more than 30 minutes but less than three hours travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of calling help (such as a telephone box).

And

b. Contains no element of steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This does not stop people from using their hands as an aid to confidence.)

And

c. Is not a road, or path adjacent to a road, on which you would expect to see traffic.

And

d. Is not Terrain Two as defined by Rule 9.30.

 

Rule 9.30 Terrain Two Definition

 

Terrain Two describes terrain which meets all of the following criteria:

 

a. Meets any of the following criteria:

  • is over 800 metres above sea level or;

  • lies more than three hours travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of calling help (such as a telephone box), or:

  • contains an element of steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This does not stop people from using their hands as an aid to confidence.)

And

b. Is not a road, or path adjacent to a road.

 

Rule 9.31 Specialist Terrain

 

When in terrain or using skills that have not been assessed for a terrain 2 hillwalking or a climbing permit (such as glaciers, scrambling, via ferrata ), then specific approval is required for the activity from the responsible Commissioner based on advice from someone with knowledge and experience of the activity. Specific approval is in addition to the holding of a terrain 2 hillwalking or climbing permit.

 

Summer means any condition not covered under winter.

 

BACK

 

© 2019 by Kent Scouts Outdoor Adventures